Blue-Tongued Skink Care Sheet | Reptiles' Cove (2023)

ScientificFacts

Common NameBlue-Tongued Skink
Scientific NameTiliqua scincoidesintermedia
Life Span15 to 20 years
SizeFrom a few inches(hatchlings) to 2 feet as adults
HabitatSandy soil
Country of OriginAustralia andIndonesia

PhysicalDescription

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As the name alreadysuggests, what is most striking and noticeable about the Blue-Tongued Skink isits bright blue tongue. You could easily tell this species of reptiles apartfrom all of the other lizards by simply looking at its tongue. While there aresome reptiles with a blue forked tongue, the Blue-Tongued Skink tends to haveone that comes in a strikingly bright color that is really hard to miss. Theyusually protrude their tongue more often than normal when they are in defensemode or when they feel threatened. So, if you happen to see the tongue wellenough, there is a chance that this reptile feels a bit of aggression comingfrom you.

The head of aBlue-Tongued Skink is wedged and has colors and patterns that can be distinctfrom its neck. Moreover, the top of the head is slightly flattened compared toother reptiles with rounder tops. Meanwhile, the ear openings tend to beconspicuous enough for you to see them. And when you see their teeth, you willnotice that they are not too long and sort of blunt. Blue-Tongued Skinks tendto have short legs. Their tails are also short and are usually not longer thanthe body.

Speaking of theirbody, these reptiles generally have large and long bodies that are covered bysmooth and shiny scales. They are usually greyish or brownish in terms of colorand have symmetrical horizontal patterns that follow from the tail up to theend of the body just before where their necks start. The patterns or the bandsare darker in terms of color. In some way, their color scheme is similar tothat of a python but what makes them look different are the patterns drapedacross their bodies.

Types

There are actually different types ofBlue-Tongued Skinks. The types depend on where they are native to.

Classic Indonesian

The Classic Indonesian Blue-Tongued Skinkshave a striking body coloration that is yellowish. Meanwhile, the bands thatsurround their body have a solid black color that is similar to their limbs.

Halmahera Indonesian

The Halmahera Indonesian is almost the sameas the Classic Indonesian but they are usually reddish in color instead ofyellowish. Nevertheless, the other features such as the black marks and theblack limbs are the same.

Kei Island

Kei Island Blue-Tongued Skinks look likethey have freckles on their face. They are closer to an orangey kind of brownin terms of color.

Irian Jaya

Technically still Blue-Tongued Skinks, theIrian Jaya variety is the black sheep of the species. They are light brown interms of color but have auburn or dark orange bands that cover their bodies.

Merauke

The Merauke have freckles in their arms andlegs, have a light brown body with auburn-colored bands, and an orange belly.These types of Blue-Tongued Skinks have really long bodies and are generallycalmer than most other types.

Tanimbar

The Tanimbar Blue-Tongued Skinks are someof the most physically striking types. You can usually see them in a yellowishkind of color and tend to have shiny or glossy scales.

Blotched

The Blotched are native to Australia andcan live up to 30 years. They also tend to be some of the longer varieties ofBlue-Tongued Skinks and can reach lengths of more than 2 feet. You candistinguish them from all other types because of the striking patterns ofyellow and orange covering their backs.

Centralian

Centralians are native to the central partof Australia. They are shorter than Blotched and have stouter bodies and largerheads than normal. As such, those features make their arms and legs lookshorter than other types of Blue-Tongued Skinks. They are usually light brownor light yellow in terms of color. Meanwhile, the bands or patterns on theirbacks are dark yellow or orange.

Eastern

As the name suggests, Easterns are nativeto the eastern portion of Australia. They can grow to up to 2 feet and are themost common types of Blue-Tongued Skinks. They have light brown bodies coveredby dark brown bands.

(Video) Cage setup! Enclosure setup for the *Eastern blue tongue skink!!!*

Northern

The Northern Blue-Tongued Skinks areregarded as the most popular types anywhere in the world and are the ones thatare kept as pets or for captive breeding. They look similar to the Easterns butthey have grey forelimbs and yellowish or orange oval markings on the sides oftheir bodies.

Lifespan

Blue-Tongued Skinksusually live longer than most other pet reptiles, which have a lifespan ofsomewhere near 10 years. In this case, the Blue-Tongued Skinks live somewhereclose to 20 years. In some cases, there have been reports of such reptilesliving close to 30 years. If your Blue-Tongued Skink only lives for about 15 orso years, then there must be a problem with the way you took care of them. Inthat case, if you want them to live north of 20 years, it is vital that youknow how to properly care for these reptiles.

Eating Habits

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Blue-Tongued Skinks aremostly carnivorous in nature as they love to hunt for insects when they areleft alone to fend for themselves in the wild. Crickets, grasshoppers, worms,snails, and almost any other insects are regular parts of a Blue-TonguedSkink’s diet. In some cases, these reptiles even prey on smaller lizards androdents. As long as they can get their hands on it and that the prey is smallenough for them, Blue-Tongued Skinks will eat them.

However, in reality,Blue-Tongued Skinks are actually omnivorous and can eat fruits and vegetablesespecially when they are kept in captivity. In that sense, these reptilesshould be given a balanced diet that is composed of meat, fruits, andvegetables if you want them to thrive and live long in captivity. Of course,the proportion of fruits and vegetables they eat as against their proteinintake should very much vary depending on their age.

Hatchlings orBlue-Tongued Skinks up to about three months old should be fed regularly andalmost every single day. These young reptiles need to have a diet composed ofabout 70 to 80% protein to help their muscles grow well. Meanwhile, juvenileBlue-Tongued Skinks of about 3 to 8 months old need to eat thrice a week.

As Blue-TonguedSkinks get older, they should be fed less often to prevent them from gettingobese. Moreover, their diet should be composed of about 50 to 60% protein only.They should be getting 30 to 40% of their food from vegetables. The rest shouldbe fruits. Most adult Blue-Tongued Skinks should be fed only once or twice aweek.

Aside from insects,the best protein source you can give Blue-Tongued Skinks are eggs, groundpoultry meat, and mice or fish as treats only. For vegetables, give them lotsof greens and make sure to avoid spinach, broccoli, and lettuce. Berries,peaches, apples, and similar fruits are good for these reptiles but avoidfeeding them seeds.

SleepingHabits

Blue-Tongued Skinksare diurnal creatures that tend to be active during the day and less activeduring the night. This means that you should not worry about them at night whenyou are also sleeping because, chances are, they are also sleeping or are at leastnot so active. It is normal for younger Blue-Tongued Skinks to be sleeping allday because it helps them grow. The older they get, the more active they becomebut not too active. They would still prefer to take naps from time to timeduring the day after finding a good spot to borrow through.

Water

Tap water isperfectly safe for Blue-Tongued Skinks as long as it is also safe for drinkingfor humans. You should use a large water bowl as a water source for yourreptile because of how they tend to soak their bodies in water to make iteasier for them to shed and to stay hydrated. Go for a dish that is no deeperthan 3 inches. Having a large water dish of about 9 to 10 inches does not onlyprovide a good hydration source for your Blue-Tongued Skinks but it also helpsin maintaining the humidity level in their enclosure.

You should make sureto change their water every 2 days especially when it gets dirty. Blue-TonguedSkinks love to defecate in their water source, so be sure to disinfect theentire dish after taking it out to prevent illness.

Developmentand Reproduction

Telling females apartfrom males can be a bit tricky when it comes to the Blue-Tongued Skink. However,males tend to be a bit larger compared to the females. Their heads are biggerand their tails are also thicker if you measure the base. In some cases, themales have a brighter shade of orange compared to the females. Nevertheless,such features are not always conclusive when it comes to telling them apart.You may need to go to an expert to really assess whether your Blue-TonguedSkink is either male or female.

In most American andEuropean regions, people tend to breed their Blue-Tongued Skinks during thespring season somewhere in March to May right after their hibernation period,which is usually around November to February. The Indonesian types ofBlue-Tongued Skinks do not have a typical hibernation period but they still dobreed better during the dry seasons.

How to Breed

The best way to breedyour Blue-Tongued Skinks is to place them together in a large enclosure duringthe springtime. This is when you will see if they are compatible with oneanother. You might see the male freezing in his place for a while before tryingto make his move. And when he makes his move, he is an aggressive reptile. Itwill be common for the male to bite and to claw his way to the female just toget a good mounting position for mating.

(Video) Blue-tongued Lizard, Wildlife Habitat, Port Douglas, Queensland

Blue-Tongued Skinkstend to be solitary creatures that spend most of their lives isolated fromtheir kind. In that sense, the female’s demeanor can be somewhat defensiveduring mating season when the male becomes too aggressive. Be careful whenhandling them and try not to get your hands on the reptiles when things get abit too rough. But if you think that the aggression becomes too much to thepoint that injuries might possibly happen, it is best to separate the two.

It is normal for thefemale to suffer injuries during the mating process. However, the female willeventually submit to the male and will raise her tail as a sign that she isready for mating. After that, try to weight your female as much as you can andsee if her weight is increasing. If she is getting heavier, that means that sheis pregnant. Give her the nutrition she needs to develop healthy and thriving babyBlue-Tongued Skinks.

Common HealthProblems

Like any otherreptile species, Blue-Tongued Skinks also have common health problems that canpose a risk to their overall health and lifespan. As long as you know theseproblems, you will be able to equip yourself with the proper tools andinformation to prevent these health issues as much as possible.

Metabolic bone disease

This health problem usually arises inBlue-Tongued Skinks kept in captivity. The reason why it is so common for suchreptiles is that the phosphorus to calcium ratio tends to be out of balanceespecially when they are not receiving the right kind of light or when they areunder a poor diet. If your Blue-Tongued Skink is suffering from such a disease,you will notice an overall weakness in your reptile. They will be feelinglethargic, lazy, and unmotivated. Fractured bones can be common as well.

Parasitic infections

Parasitic infections are quite common inBlue-Tongued Skins. These reptiles will usually suffer from intestinalparasites as a result of stress especially when they are the types that werecaptured from the wild. Healthier Blue-Tongued Skinks usually have strongenough immune systems to prevent the parasites from overpopulating the body.However, when they are under a lot of stress especially when captured ones arestill in the middle of adjusting to an entirely new environment, the immunesystem might weaken and the parasites might overwhelm their body. Symptoms ofinternal parasitic infections include loss of appetite, weight loss, lethargy,and diarrhea.

Meanwhile, mites are the most commonexternal parasites your Blue-Tongued Skins can suffer from. These mites willsuck the blood out of your reptiles through their skin. Symptoms of mites caninclude rubbing, lethargy, weakness, prolonged soaking, and loss of appetite.

Respiratory infections

Respiratory infections are actually verycommon among reptiles. These are usually caused by bacterial infections in thelungs. The most common reasons for such infections are cold weather, low orhigh humidity, and stress. Symptoms can include wheezing, weepy eyes, loss ofappetite, runny nose, and open-mouth breathing.

PreventingIllness

The best way for youto prevent illnesses in your Blue-Tongued Skinks is to make sure that they aregiven the right conditions in their enclosure. The temperature, humidity, andsanitation should be up to par for what such reptiles need to be able to livecomfortably and healthily. Of course, you yourself should also make sure thatyou know what you are doing and that you sanitize yourself when handling them.Your hands can be a common way of transmitting parasites such as mites. So makesure you sanitize your hands before handling them. Proper sanitation of theirwater dish as well as of their entire enclosure are also vital.

If it is impossibleto avoid illnesses, make sure you get your Blue-Tongued Skink to a vet rightaway. Keep a list of veterinarians that are capable of handling reptilesbecause not all vets are trained and knowledgeable when it comes to exotictypes of animals such as Blue-Tongued Skinks as well as other types ofreptiles.

Behavior

Blue-Tongued Skinksare not the most active of reptile species. In fact, one can easily say thatthey were simply not made to be active types of reptiles. They are quitedocile, quiet, gentle, and even submissive at times. This makes it easy formost pet owners to tame Blue-Tongued Skinks. Despite their docile, quiet, andgentle nature, Blue-Tongued Skinks are easily threatened when they feel a bitagitated. These are defensive creatures instead of aggressive ones. As such,when they feel like they need to defend themselves, they will hiss, bite, andexpose their tongues as a means of showing that they are not afraid.

By exposing theirblue tongues, these skinks can defend themselves well from predators. They areslow and heavy creatures that do not have a lot of other tools that could allowthem to perform well in battle. As such, they use their tongues to scare anypotential threat as the blue color is a bluff of sorts to make their enemiesthink that they carry a potent poison.

(Video) The Blue-tongued Lizard in our garden

Nevertheless, as longas you handle your Blue-Tongued Skinks a lot, they will recognize you as theirowner or as a more dominant creature. As such, they will become more passiveand friendly towards you and might not feel agitated or defensive towards you.This will make it easier for you to tame and pet them. They will noticeably gazeat you from time to time in a friendly manner. What that means is that theywill be open for some bonding sessions with you.

HibernationCycle

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Hibernation isencouraged in Blue-Tongued Skinks especially during the cold winter seasons ofOctober to February. During this time, you will notice that their activitylevel will drop dramatically. As such, feeding should be decreased to onceevery two weeks because of how they will hardly ever move during this time. Youare also encouraged to drop the temperature in the enclosure to allow yourBlue-Tongued Skink to hibernate easier. This will go on for about four months.After the period of hibernation, gradually raise the temperature level back tonormal and make sure to feed them regularly again.

Shedding

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It is perfectlynormal for the Blue-Tongued Skinks to shed a lot because it is their nature asreptiles. They will shed as they grow. That means that the younger Blue-TonguedSkinks will shed more often than older ones because they are in the process ofcontinuous growth. They will most likely rub their skins on a rough surface tomake shedding easier. Also, on top of that, it is also easier on their part toshed when their skin is hydrated. To that end, you should make sure to keep alarge water dish to allow your reptile to drench their body in water. This willmake it easier for them to shed their old skin away.

Habitat

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The enclosure of aBlue-Tongued Skink should ideally be a terrarium that is about 4 feet long, 2feet wide, and a foot and a half deep. The large size of the enclosure is toallow the reptiles to roam around freely during the day when they are at theirmost active. You can even place hatchlings in an adult-sized terrarium becausethey tend to love to hide as a means of feeling safe and secured from potentialpredators.

You may need aminimum of 8 feet of floor space to house your Blue-Tongued Skink. Also, makesure that the terrarium has a front opening to make it easier for you to accessthe interior. There should be a lid that is solid enough to prevent the reptilefrom escaping but not too solid as to prevent air from entering the enclosure.The important part is to make sure that the top is securely latched to preventthe skink from trying to escape.

Go for a woodenterrarium if you want to trap or hold heat really well. Unfortunately, moldstend to develop easier especially when the humidity levels are high. Meanwhile,glass is easy to clean and very nice to look at. But it isn’t the best atretaining heat.

Lighting andHumidity

Use heat lamps tolight your enclosure because Blue-Tongued Skinks are used to regions that arequite hot. An ultraviolet B or UVB light might be a good option for you becausethis type of lamp also provides your reptile with the vitamins they need tobalance out their phosphorous and calcium levels. You may need only two lamps.It is preferred that you use a UVB lamp at the cool end of the enclosure and aheat lamp over to where your reptile usually loves to bask. These lizards donot need a light source at night because they tend to stay active only duringthe day.

In terms of humidity,make sure that the terrarium is quite humid and has an average humidity levelof somewhere between 40 to 60%. This makes it easier for your Blue-TonguedSkinks to shed their skin. It also keeps them hydrated while they are baskingunder the heat of the lights. The best way to help keep humidity levelsconsistent is to mist the enclosure using a sprayer. You can also use a largewatering dish to help keep the humidity high enough for your reptile.

Temperature

Blue-Tongued Skinksprefer an environment that is quite hot due to how they are commonly found inregions with high temperatures. These cold-blooded reptiles rely on heat tokeep their bodies warm and to function well. In that sense, make sure toprovide them with a lot of heat in their terrarium. A heating lamp is the bestway to do so. Make sure to put the heating lamp in their basking area, whichrequires a temperature of about 100 to 105 degrees Fahrenheit. The rest of theenclosure can stay somewhere over 85 degrees.

At night, it isnormal for the Blue-Tongued Skink to feel a bit cold. That means that you mightnot need to provide them with the heat at night. So long as temperatures do notdrop lower than 65 degrees at night, things will be perfectly fine for yourreptile.

Sanitation

Blue-Tongued Skinkshave a habit of defecating on their water source. So make sure to replace thewater once every two or three days. You should also disinfect the dish to makesure that no bacteria stays in place. Speaking of bacteria, try to clean out theirterrariums regularly as well. And when you are handling your reptile, make sureyou disinfect your hands too to avoid getting mites on them.

(Video) Eastern Brown Snake eating A Blue tongue lizard

NaturalEnvironment – Substrate

The substrate orbedding you can use for your Blue-Tongued Skink’s terrarium can be mulch thatcan be a bit deep because these reptiles love digging and hiding for shelter.However, the humidity of the substrate also depends on the type of Blue-TonguedSkink you have. Australian species, who are used to the dry desert conditions ofAustralia, need dry substrates. Meanwhile, those that come from the wet areasof Indonesia require humid substrates.

Hydration

Blue-Tongued Skinksdo love to drink a lot of water to keep their internals hydrated. At the sametime, they also love submerging their entire body in water to keep externaltemperatures cool and to make shedding easier. That means that you should keepa large water dish in their terrarium. Preferably, keep it large enough toallow the reptile to submerge its entire body. The large water dish also allowsyou to control the humidity levels better.

Availability– Where to Get One?

There are plenty ofexotic pet shops in your locality or online that sell Blue-Tongued Skinks.However, most of those that captured skinks sell Indonesian varieties becauseof how Australia has banned the export of exotic creatures to the rest of theworld. But if you get your hands on an Australian variant, it was most likelybred in captivity from parents that were captured before the ban.

How to Carefor a Blue-Tongued Skink?

Here are some tips onhow to care for a Blue-Tongued Skink:

  • Blue-TonguedSkinks are extra defensive especially when they are adjusting. You can tellthat they are agitated when they show their tongues a lot. That means that youshould give them time to adjust before you try to handle them. But once they doadjust to you, they are friendly and quite affectionate towards their owner.
  • Keeptheir enclosures warm because Blue-Tongued Skinks are used to regions that arequite hot. Use a heating lamp to provide them with the heat they desire butalso use a UVB light to balance out their phosphorous to calcium ratio so thatyou will be able to prevent any associated illnesses.
  • Ahealthy and balanced diet is one of the keys to making your Blue-Tongued Skinkthrive well. That means that you should not solely feed it with protein comingfrom insects and meat but also lots of fruits and vegetables to provide themwith a balanced and nutritious diet.
  • Keepyour hands clean when handling them so as to prevent mites from attaching toyour Blue-Tongued Skinks. Mites are tiny black parasites that can easily suckblood from the skin of your reptiles. They are very easy to miss because theyare so tiny and can be mistaken for dirt.

FAQs

How bigshould Blue-Tongued Skinks enclosures be?

Blue-Tongued Skinksare somewhat on the large side and can be quite active during the day. Thatmeans that you should provide them with an enclosure that is large enough forthem and is about 8 feet in total space occupied so that they will be able toenjoy a large area where they can roam around whenever they feel like it.

Are Blue-TonguedSkinks solely for experienced owners?

It really dependsbecause Blue-Tongued Skinks are not really difficult reptiles to handle but canbe tricky for those who have no experience when it comes to breeding. Thatmeans that these creatures are best for those with a bit of experience inhandling reptiles and other forms of exotic pets.

AreBlue-Tongued Skinks friendly?

Blue-Tongued Skinksare generally friendly towards their owners once they have adjusted to life incaptivity. That said, those who are new to handling one should best be carefulbecause these reptiles can easily feel agitated and defensive towards facesthey are not familiar with.

AreBlue-Tongued Skinks active?

Blue-Tongued Skinksare diurnal and are active during the day but can easily feel lazy. They tendto be far less active whenever its nighttime and are often found sleepingwhenever it is dark.

AreBlue-Tongued Skinks dangerous?

They generally arenot because Blue-Tongued Skinks are not poisonous. Their bites are not evenmade for piercing or tearing because of how flat their teeth are. But youshould still be careful of their bites because of their strong jaws.

AreBlue-Tongued Skinks aggressive?

Blue-Tongued Skinksgenerally are not aggressive creatures and are usually defensive. They willshow their tongue and display a bit of dominance whenever they feel like youare aggressive towards them.

Why doBlue-Tongued Skinks have blue tongues?

The Blue-Tongued Skinshave tongues that are colored blue for defensive purposes. This allows them toshow their tongues to their potential attackers and to make them feelthreatened by the color blue, which will make any aggressor think that they arepoisonous creatures.

(Video) A Reptile Hobbyist - A Documentary Directed and Edited By Squire Lysander

AreBlue-Tongued Skinks affectionate?

Blue-Tongued Skinksare one of the rare types of reptiles that are quite affectionate towardshumans in the sense that they even resemble mammals because of how affectionatethey are. That said, they will only show affection if they are already used toyou as they are somewhat defensive types of reptiles that will show agitationtowards anything that threatens them.

Ishibernation normal for Blue-Tongued Skinks?

Since Blue-TonguedSkinks live in areas where climates can change quickly and where temperaturescan drop seasonally, it is perfectly normal for them to hibernate during thecold seasons from October to February. In fact, hibernation should beencouraged since that is the very nature of these reptiles whenever the seasongets too cold for them to function normally.

CanBlue-Tongued Skinks eat normal pet food?

Yes, they can.Blue-Tongued Skinks can eat normal pet food such as a dog or cat food as theycontain essential nutrients that even these reptiles need to survive. It isbest to pair dog and cat food with vegetables to provide your Blue-TonguedSkinks a healthy and balanced diet instead of one that is composed of pureprotein.

FAQs

Is a 40 gallon big enough for a blue tongue skink? ›

Blue-Tongue Skink Caging

A 40-gallon breeder tank is best for mature blue-tongue skinks, while babies should be housed in a 10 to 20-gallon terrarium. Adults required a minimum of eight square feet of floor space.

What temperature do blue tongue skinks need? ›

For your blue tongued skink the range is 28-33 °C. A temperature gradient with a cool end of 21-26°C (70-80°F) a warm end of 28-33 °C (82-90°F), and basking spot of 33-38°C (92-100°F) will ensure your skink has the ability to choose their preferred temperature.

How often should I mist my blue tongue skink? ›

Misting the enclosure once a day will usually provide enough moisture for your blue tongue, but a nice humidity gauge can help you in this area.

How much UVB do blue tongue skinks need? ›

Blue- tongue skinks require a gradient of UVB within their enclosure ranging from UVI 3.0-5.0 in the basking zone to zero in the shade.

Can a blue tongue skink live in a 55 gallon tank? ›

Full sized adult blue-tongue skinks should be kept in 40 to 55-gallon aquariums or similar enclosures. Temperature: A temperature gradient of 75°-85°F should be established with a basking area of 90°-95°F during the day. Temperatures should not fall below 70°F at night.

Can a blue tongue skink live in a 75 gallon tank? ›

Ideally, we recommend a 4' x 2' x 2' enclosure for an adult blue tongue skink. A 40 gallon enclosure can work temporarily or for a smaller individual, but large adult blue tongues do best in at least 75 gallon enclosures.

Do blue-tongues need heat at night? ›

Blue tongue skinks generally do not need any kind of lighting or heating during the night. Some people prefer red or black bulbs for providing nighttime heat, but it's actually healthier for skinks to experience a nightly temperature drop.

How long can blue-tongues go without heat? ›

In captivity, tropical blue tongue skink species should not be forced to brumate, although they may brumate as an instinctive reaction to your local weather if you live in a temperate climate with significant weather changes between summer and winter. Brumation for tropical species can last 1-4 months.

Do skinks need baths? ›

It is not necessary to bathe your skink all the time.

How long can blue tongue skinks go without food? ›

A blue tongue skink can go weeks without eating – blue tongue skinks during brumation can go up to 3 months without food. However, this is not recommended outside brumation – babies will not survive for too long because they don't have as much internal fat storage as adults.

Why is my blue tongue lizard trying to climb the glass? ›

Blue tongue skinks glass surf when the tank is either too small or too large. It may also be a temperature issue wherein the tank is too hot. Blue tongue skinks also glass surf when they are stressed and lack enrichment. Lastly, they also glass surf when trying to find a mate.

How long does it take for a blue tongue skink to reach full size? ›

Females give birth to an average of 10 live young at a time, with a maximum clutch size of 25. There is no parental care, and the young skinks are on their own soon after birth. The young grow very quickly and can reach adult size in less than one year.

Do blue tongue skinks like to soak? ›

HUMIDITY Blue tongue skinks require low to moderate humidity. A mossy area and a shallow water dish are adequate, as they are not avid swimmers. Soak the skink in a container of shallow lukewarm water once a week to ensure proper hydration.

Do blue tongue skinks sleep alot? ›

So, you'll find that during the months of December or January, blue tongue skinks become less active, eat less, and sleep more. Over time, they'll sleep all day long for 4 to 6 weeks as well.

Do blue tongue skink bites hurt? ›

Due to their size and the crushing power of their jaws, yes, it does hurt when Blue Tongue Skinks bite. Their jaws aren't designed to slice and tear, so they rarely break the skin much with a bite. However, they are designed to crush up food items such as snail shells, so they're very strong!

What veggies can a blue tongue skink eat? ›

Items such as broccoli, brussel sprouts, bell-pepper, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, parsnips, sweet potato, spring greens, pumpkin and turnip are also good for occasional feeding, to help keep a picky vegetable dodger happy.

Can blue tongue skinks swim? ›

A: Blue tongue skinks are not strong swimmers, and are not meant to swim. Water does not hurt them however, and there is nothing wrong with placing them in shallow water. It's actually a humorous sight! They attempt to swim by straightening their legs to their bodies, and wiggling their tail.

How often do blue tongue lizards eat? ›

Feeding. Feed your adult bluetongue every two days in warm weather, in colder weather every three days. Remember — if the enclosure temperature is not right your bluetongue may refuse to eat. Bluetongues are omnivores and should be offered a variety of foods such as insects e.g. crickets, worms, snails and slugs.

How often do skinks eat? ›

Feed skinks every one to two days. All produce offered should be fresh, high quality items fit for human consumption and pesticide free. Finely chopped fresh greens and mixed vegetables should make up 45% to 60% of an adult skink's diet.

How big should a blue tongue skink cage be? ›

An adult blue-tongued skink requires, at minimum, an enclosure measuring 36 inches long by 18 inches wide by 10 inches tall, with a full screen top. Larger is even better. Remember, blue-tongued skinks are terrestrial and prefer floor space over climbing area.

How do you pick up a blue tongue lizard? ›

First, you'll need to make sure it is indeed a lizard and not a snake. Then, when picking it up, make it feel as safe as possible. Start by gently holding, then lifting, the lizard from behind its head. Supporting its legs – so it still feels connected to something solid – will help to make it feel more comfortable.

What kills blue tongue lizards? ›

Blue Tongue Lizard Predators and Threats What Kills Blue Tongue Skinks? The blue-tongued lizard predators include dingoes, kookaburras, snakes, foxes, and dogs. Feral cats are one of its most ferocious predators.

Can blue-tongues eat spinach? ›

As for specific foods, blue tongue skinks are omnivores; they can eat fruits, vegetables, and a few different forms of protein. However, you're going to want to prioritize protein and veggies over fruit, since they offer more nutritional benefits.

How do you keep a blue tongue lizard warm? ›

Blue-tongues require a basking spot maintained between 33-35˚C. They should have access to an elevated piece of flat timber or rock ornament to allow them to bask closer to the heat source. The cool end of the enclosure should be maintained between 24-26˚C and should not drop below 18-21˚C at night.

Do blue tongue skinks eat daily? ›

Dietary Requirements for Blue-tongued Skinks

As juveniles, half of their diet should come from insects, whereas adults should eat proportionately more plant matter. Adult, Blue-tongued skinks can be fed every one to two days, while juveniles can be fed daily. The bulk of the diet (45-60%) should consist of greens.

Do blue-tongue lizards eat at night? ›

Blue-tongued lizards are omnivores. Garden snails are their ideal food, but they will also enjoy most varieties of fruits and veggies. For a treat, feed them crickets and mice which you can buy at your local Petbarn store. Blue-tongues usually eat from late morning through to midday after getting some sun.

What lighting does a blue tongue skink need? ›

Blue tongued skinks also require UVB lighting to thrive and be healthy. Using a Zilla Heat & UVB Basking Fixture with a Zilla 50W Mini Halogen bulb and a Zilla Desert Series 50 UVB Bulb will provide the correct heat and UVB needed for your blue tongue skink to thrive.

Do blue tongue skinks carry salmonella? ›

Like other reptiles, blue tongue skinks can carry Salmonella. Always wash your hands after handling reptiles or items from their enclosure.

Do lizards like to get wet? ›

Lizards usually don't like their homes getting wet. Make sure water can drain away from containers by angling the opening down, or make sure that they are on mounded, higher points. Lizards are cold blooded and can't produce their own body heat. They rely on warmth from the sun every morning.

Can you train a blue tongue skink? ›

After your blue tongue skink becomes more comfortable with you and doesn't run away or hide from you, you can start handling sessions. Start with short handling sessions and slowly build it up.

What is a good size tank for a blue tongue skink? ›

Terrarium Size

Blue tongue skinks are relatively large lizards that grow quickly, so the minimum recommended enclosure size even for a baby is going to be 4'x2'x2', or 8 sq ft of floor space. Blue tongue skinks are quite active, so if you can afford/fit a larger enclosure, it's strongly advised to do so.

How many gallons does a blue tongue skink need? ›

Adult blue tongue skinks can live very healthy lives in a tank size of 40 or 50-gallon. As a bare minimum, the enclosure should measure at least 36 inches long, 18 inches wide, and 10 inches tall.

How big a tank does a full grown blue tongue skink need? ›

An adult blue-tongued skink requires, at minimum, an enclosure measuring 36 inches long by 18 inches wide by 10 inches tall, with a full screen top. Larger is even better. Remember, blue-tongued skinks are terrestrial and prefer floor space over climbing area.

What size tank does a Blue tongue lizard need? ›

The enclosure for an adult, Blue-tongued skink, should measure no less than 120-180 cm long (4-6 feet) and around 45-60 cm high (1.5-2 feet), but larger is ideal. Good ventilation is essential to manage air circulation, temperature, and humidity.

Do blue tongue skinks like to soak? ›

HUMIDITY Blue tongue skinks require low to moderate humidity. A mossy area and a shallow water dish are adequate, as they are not avid swimmers. Soak the skink in a container of shallow lukewarm water once a week to ensure proper hydration.

What veggies can a blue tongue skink eat? ›

Items such as broccoli, brussel sprouts, bell-pepper, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, parsnips, sweet potato, spring greens, pumpkin and turnip are also good for occasional feeding, to help keep a picky vegetable dodger happy.

Do blue tongue skink bites hurt? ›

Due to their size and the crushing power of their jaws, yes, it does hurt when Blue Tongue Skinks bite. Their jaws aren't designed to slice and tear, so they rarely break the skin much with a bite. However, they are designed to crush up food items such as snail shells, so they're very strong!

Do blue tongue skinks need heat at night? ›

Blue tongue skinks generally do not need any kind of lighting or heating during the night. Some people prefer red or black bulbs for providing nighttime heat, but it's actually healthier for skinks to experience a nightly temperature drop.

How often do skinks eat? ›

Feed skinks every one to two days. All produce offered should be fresh, high quality items fit for human consumption and pesticide free. Finely chopped fresh greens and mixed vegetables should make up 45% to 60% of an adult skink's diet.

What happens if a skink bites you? ›

Skinks bites are mild and pain-free, so they are not dangerous to humans. Despite their slight skin resemblance to snakes, skinks are not poisonous or venomous. Their bites are also mild and minor. Therefore, they do not pose any danger to humans.

How long does it take for a blue tongue to grow to full size? ›

Blue-tongues have between one and fifteen babies who are able to look after themselves just four days after birth. But it will take three to four years before they are fully grown.

Do blue tongue lizards like hammocks? ›

Hammock: Your blue tongue skink can enjoy laying or climbing on a hammock to bask. If you wish to include a hammock in the tank, make sure to attach it close to the ground, because blue tongues can't climb much because of short legs.

Are Blue Tongue Skinks high maintenance? ›

Skinks make great pets for people who enjoy a low-key, low-maintenance reptile. Once an adult skink is settled in a nice reptile tank, it only requires feeding once or twice a week, changing the water, and monthly cleaning of the terrarium.

What kills blue tongue lizards? ›

Blue Tongue Lizard Predators and Threats What Kills Blue Tongue Skinks? The blue-tongued lizard predators include dingoes, kookaburras, snakes, foxes, and dogs. Feral cats are one of its most ferocious predators.

Can blue-tongues eat banana? ›

Bluetongues are omnivores and should be offered a variety of foods such as insects e.g. crickets, worms, snails and slugs. They will eat a range of chopped fruits and vegetables including dandelion, milk thistle, watercress, banana, apple, pawpaw, pear, green beans, carrots, alfafa sprouts, parsley and tomato.

Do blue tongue lizards Recognise people? ›

Other work has shown that male Blue-tongue Lizards who wander through Sydney suburbs remember all the females they have visited on their travels. "These supposedly primitive animals have a much more complex capacity for recognition than we imagine," said Professor Shine.

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